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Research Staff

Toni Antalis Laboratory

Antalis_Toni

Toni Antalis PhD

Research in my laboratory is focused on the functions of proteases, the powerful hydrolytic enzymes that regulate the activities of many cellular proteins in vascular biology, angiogenesis and cancer. Specifically, we aim to understand how membrane serine proteases and their inhibitors contribute to cell survival, differentiation and malignant transformation. This work will provide insight into basic mechanisms of cell behavior, and enable the development of new targets for therapeutic interventions.

Laboratory Members

Marguerite Buzza
Research Associate
Room 235
V: (410) 706-8223
F: (410) 706-8121
mbuzza@som.umaryland.edu 

Nadire Duru
Research Associate
Room 235
V: (410) 706-8223
F: (410) 706-8121
nduru@som.umaryland.edu 

Tierra Johnson
Graduate Student
Room 235
V: (410) 706-8223
F: (410) 706-8121
Tjohnson@som.umaryland.edu 

Raymond Peroutka
Graduate Student
Room 235
V: (410) 706-8223
F: (410) 706-8121
Raymond.Peroutka@som.umaryland.edu 

Nisha Pawar
Graduate Student
Room 235
V: (410) 706-8223
F: (410) 706-8121
NPawar@umaryland.edu 

 

 


Jonathan S. Bromberg Laboratory

Jonathan Bromberg, MD, PhD

Jonathan S. Bromberg MD, PhD

Jonathan S. Bromberg, MD, PhD, a national leader in uncovering the secrets of the immune system in order to prevent rejection following organ transplants, has joined the University of Maryland School of Medicine as professor of surgery and microbiology and immunology. Dr. Bromberg is a kidney and pancreas transplant surgeon who will care for patients at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He will be the director of research in the Division of Transplantation and director of Strategic Services for Transplantation

Laboratory Members

Lushen Li
Post-Doc Fellow
Room 330
V: (410) 706-8070
F: (410) 706-8234
lli@som.umaryland.edu 

Wenji Piao
Research Associate
Room 330
V: (410) 706-8070
F: (410) 706-8234
WPiao@som.umaryland.edu 

Vikas Saxena
Post-Doc Fellow
Room 330
V: (410) 706-8070
F: (410) 706-8234
VSaxena@som.umaryland.edu 

Marina WillsonShirkey
Laboratory Research Technician 
Room 330
V: (410) 706-8070
F: (410) 706-8234
MWillsonShirkey@som.umaryland.edu 

Yanbao Xiong
Research Associate
Room 330
V: (410) 706-8070
F: (410) 706-8234
vaxiong@smail.umaryland.edu 


Nancy Fossett Laboratory

Nancy Fossett, PhD

Hematopoiesis is coordinated by key regulatory molecules that drive lineage-specific developmental programs. Current models depict lineage commitment as a process that involves cross-antagonism between blood cell programs, which promotes one lineage at the expense of the others. The long-term goal of my laboratory is to better define the molecular genetic strategies that regulate hematopoiesis. This goal is accomplished by studying how evolutionarily conserved factors regulate blood and heart cell development in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

Laboratory Members

Rajkumar Baldeosign
Research Assistant
Room 230
V: (410) 706-8063
F: (410) 706-8121
 

Linda Brady
Lab Assistant
Room 230
V: (410) 706-8063
F: (410) 706-8121


Achsah Keegan Laboratory

Achsah Keegan PhD

Research in my laboratory is focused on signaling by the cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. These cytokines regulate many functions including protection from apoptosis, regulation of allergy and asthma, and the control of myeloid development and function. This work will provide insight into better therapies for asthma, inflammation, and for certain cancers.

Laboratory Members

Svetlana Chapoval
Assistant Professor
Room 340
V: (410) 706-8175
F: (410) 706-8234
schapoval@som.umaryland.edu

Hongjuan Gao
Research Associate
Room 340
V: (410) 706-8175
F: (410) 706-8234
hgao@som.umaryland.edu 

Xiulan Qi
Research Specialist
Room 340
V: (410) 706-8234
F: (410) 706-8175
xqi@som.umaryland.edu 


Leonid Medved Laboratory

Leonid Medved

Leonid Medved, PhD

My Laboratory is focused on the structure and interactions of fibrin(ogen). Specifically, we aim to complete the high resolution structure of the fibrinogen molecule and establish molecular mechanisms of its interaction with Lipoprotein(a), endothelial cells and leukocytes. This work will provide insight into the role of fibrin(ogen) in such important physiological and pathological processes as inflammation, angiogenesis and atherogenesis.

Laboratory Member

Sergiy Yakovlev
Research Associate
Room 201
V: (410) 706-8066
F: (410) 706-8121
syakovlyev@som.umaryland.edu 


Dudley Strickland Laboratory

Dudley K. Strickland, PhD

Dudley Strickland, PhD

Work in my laboratory focuses on inflammatory events that contribute to the progression of diseases such as atherosclerosis. Key modulators of these processes are low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family members. One member of this family, the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP) is a large cellular receptor that not only functions as an important cargo transporter, but also informs the cell of changes in its environment by mediating signaling responses. A goal of these studies is to understand the role of LRP and other LDL receptor family members in modulating cell signaling events and how this affects development of certain diseases, such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimers.

Laboratory Members

Dianaly Au
Post Doc-Fellow
Room 240
V: (410) 706-8025
F: (410) 706-8121
dau@umaryland.edu

Allison Arai
Graduate Student
Room 240
V: (410) 706-8025
F: (410) 706-8121
aarai@som.umaryland.edu  

Selen Catania
Assistant Professor
Office:213 Lab: 230
V: (410) 706-8025
F: (410) 706-8121
scatania@som.umaryland.edu 

 

 

 

Joanna Cooper
Post-Doc Fellow
Room 240
V: (410) 706-8025
F: (410) 706-8121
mchaudry@smail.umaryland.edu 

Brian Hampton
Program Director
Office: 301A
V: (410) 706-8207/8208
F: (410) 706-8234
bhampton@som.umaryland.edu 

Molly Migliorini
Laboratory Research Manager
Room 230
V: (410) 706-8015
F: (410) 706-8121
mmigliorini@smail.umaryland.edu

 

 

 

 


WINKLES_JEFF

Jeff Winkles, PhD

Research in my laboratory is focused on the biology of a cytokine named TWEAK and its cell surface receptor named Fn14, with particular emphasis on the role of this ligand-receptor pair in cancer. We have found that TWEAK is expressed in tumors and that it can induce blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) in vivo, so one of our projects is focused on determining whether this cytokine could play a role in the process of tumor neovascularization, which is required for tumor growth and metastasis. Also, since our laboratory and others have reported that Fn14 is overexpressed in several tumor types and that Fn14 levels may influence tumor cell migration, a second project is focused on the role of Fn14 in cell invasion, an essential step in the metastatic cascade. Taken together, these studies will provide insight into whether TWEAK and/or Fn14 are potential molecular targets for cancer therapy.

Zhang_Li

Li Zhang, PhD

Stem cells possess the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple tissue types, and thus are ideal source of cells for tissue repair and regeneration. However, successful stem cell-based tissue regeneration depends on our ability to prepare a homogenous stem cell population and to overcome tissue rejection mediated by host immune cells. My research program comprises two separate projects: one is focused on the roles of mesenchymal stem cells in tissue repair/regeneration and the other is to study the roles of leukocytes in physiological processes such as innate and adaptive immune responses, and in development of such diseases as: atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, and osteoporosis.

Steve Zhan

Steve Zhan, PhD

My laboratory has been investigating the molecular mechanism of tumor cell invasion by focusing on the regulation of actin polymerization, the driving force that facilitates the formation of membrane protrusions and the penetration of tumor cells into extracellular matrix. In particular, we have studied cortactin, a gene that plays a critical role in regulating the assembly of actin filaments at the foci of cellular protrusions. We showed that overexpression of cortactin, enhances metastasis and more recently that cortactin regulates cell motility and invasion by promoting membrane remodeling as well as intracellular trafficking of internalized receptors. This work has led us to investigate the mechanisms that regulate the function of cortactin by the oncogene Src and on a recently discovered cortactin binding protein called missing in metastasis (MIM). We aim to reveal the physiological and pathological role of MIM in cells and its role in tumor cell invasion.