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J. Kristie Johnson, PhD, D (ABMM)

Academic Title:

Professor

Primary Appointment:

Pathology

Secondary Appointment(s):

Microbiology and Immunology, Epidemiology & Public Health

Administrative Title:

Director, Clinical Microbiology, Laboratories Of Pathology At Ummc

Location:

22 South Greene Street, Room N2W50B

Phone (Primary):

(410) 328-6698

Fax:

(410) 328-1120

Education and Training

BS: Biology, Salisbury State University, Salisbury, Maryland (1992-1996)
M(ASCP): Clinical Microbiology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (1998-2000)
Ph.D.: Microbiology/Immunology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (1996-2002)
Fellow: Microbiology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (2003-2006)

Biosketch

Dr. Johnson is a Professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Departments of Pathology, Epidemiology and Public Health as well as Microbiology and Immunology. She is also the Director of the Clinical Microbiology and Virology Laboratories at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She is a Diplomate of the American Board of Medical Microbiology and has expertise in the diagnosis of infectious disease.

Her research focuses on the detection, transmission, and control of antimicrobial resistant organisms concentrating on methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and resistant Gram-negative bacteria to include multi-drug resistant Enterobacteriaceae (KPC, ESBLs, and plasmid mediated AmpC), Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with over 70 publications. Her expertise in the identification of bacteria, molecular and quantitative methods including PFGE, MLST, VNTR, spa typing, has been beneficial in the study of transmission. She is currently funded through both federal and industry grants in the area of detection and epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Johnson JK, Wilson LE, Zhao L, Richars K, Thom KA, Harris AD. Point Prevalence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae (KPCS) in Maryland. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 35(4):443-445. PMID:24602955
  2. Rock C, Harris AD, Johnson JK, Bischoff WE. Thom KA. 2015. Infrequent Air Contamination with Acinetobacter baumannii of Air Surrounding Known Colonized or Infected Patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 36(7):830-2. PMID: 25825865
  3. Harris AD, SS Jackson, G Robinson, L Pineles, S Leekha, KA Thom, M Doll, MM Pettigrew and JK Johnson. 2016. Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization n the ICU: Prevalence, risk factors and clinical outcomes. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 37(5):544-8. PMID:26832307.
  4. Pettigrew MM, JK Johnson, AD Harris 2016. The human microbiota:novel targets for hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic resistance. Ann Epidemiol. (Epub ahead of print). PMID:26994507

Research/Clinical Keywords

Microbiology, Immunology, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, resistant mobile genetic elements in gram negatives including extended spectrum β-lactamases and plasmid mediated AMP-C β-lactamases

Highlighted Publications

Peer-reviewed journal articles

Leber AL, Everhart K, Balada-Llasat JM, Cullison J, Daly J, Holt S, Lephart P, Salimnia H, Schreckenberger PC, DesJarlais S, Reed SL, Chapin KC, LeBlanc L, Johnson J.K., Soliven NL, Carroll K, Miller JA, Dien Bard J, Mestas J, Bankowski M, Enomoto T, Hemmert AC, Bourzac K.  Multicenter Evaluation of the BioFire FilmArray Meningitis Encephalitis Panel for the Detection of Bacteria, Viruses and Yeast in Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens.  J Clin Microbiol. 2016. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 27335149

Wallace L, SC Daugherty, S Nagaraj, JK Johnson, AD Harris, DA Rasko.  The use of comparative genomics to characterize the diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii surveillance isolates in a health care institution.  Antimicrob Agents Chemother.  2016.  (Epub ahead of prient).  PMID:  27458211

JK Johnson, GL Robinson, L Zhao, AD Harris, OC Stine, KA Thom.  Comparison of molecular typing methods for the analyses of Acinetobacter baumannii from ICU patients.  Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis.  2016.  (accepted).

E Kong, JK Johnson, MA Jabra-Rizk. Community Associated methicillin-resistant Stapylococcus aureus: An Enemy Amidst Us. PLOS Pathogens. 2016. (accepted)

G Kumarachandran, JK Johnson, E Graffunder, DA Shirley, EL Heil. Predictors of adverse outcomes in children with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutic. 2016.  (accepted)

Additional Publication Citations

Non-peer reviewed journal articles

Johnson, J.K. and D. Cashara. 2013. Current Rapid Screening Methods for Gastrointestinal Colonization of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE).Clinical Microbiology Newsletter. 35(6);46-51. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019643991300010X

Hirshon JM, Comer AC, Rosenberg JH, Johnson J.K., Moore SL, MacKenzie TD, Hall KK, Furuno JP. Methodological Challenges Associated with Developing and Implementing Antibiograms in Nursing Homes. Advances in the Prevention and Control of HAIs. June 2014. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. Available at: http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/patient-safety-resources/resources/advances-in-hai/hai-article9.html 

Abstracts

A Demogines, S. Fouch, JM Balada-Llasat, K Everhart, A Leber, T Barney, JA Daly, T Burger, P Lephart, S. Desjarlais, P Schreckenberger, C Rells, SL Reed, L LeBlanc, KC Chapin, J.K. Johnson, JA Miller, KC Carroll, J Mestas, J Dien Bard, T Enomoto, MJ Bankowski, K Holmberg, KM Bourzac. Multi-Center Clinical Evaluation of a Multiplex Meningitis/Encephalitis PCR Panel for Simultaneous Detection of Bacteria, Yeast, and Viruses in Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens. American Society of Microbiology 115th General Meeting.  May 2015. New Orleans, LA. Poster 1074.

MC Roghmann, J.K. Johnson, JD Sorkin, P Langenberg, A Lydecker, B Sorace, L Levy, L Mody.Transmission of MRSA to Healthcare Personnel Gowns and Gloves During Care of Nursing Home Residents. American Geriatric Society (AGS) Annual Meeting. May 15-17, 2015 in National Harbor, Maryland. Poster B167, chosen for the Presidential Poster Session.

Pineles L, Morgan DJ, Johnson J.K., Sorkin J, Langenberg P, Lydecker A, Lesse A, Sellick J, Gupta K, Leykum L, Lepcha N, Roghmann MC. Gown and glove use to prevent the spread of MRSA in VA Community Living Centers (CLCs). Poster presented at ID Week, October 2015, San Diego, CA.

J.K. Johnson, V Albrecht, M Karlsson, GL Robinson, V Stevens, B Werner, A Schuetz, D Wolk, EM Marlowe, E Babady, M Miller, K Culbreath, S Butler-Wu, D Diekema, JK Rasheed, B Limbago. Detection of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in US Clinical Laboratories. ASM Microbe 2016 Meeting on June 20, 2016 in Boston, MA.

H Poonawala, K Saharia, S Medino-Moreno, M Filippell, JK Johnson, S Leekha, RR Redfield.  Use of a Single Xpert MTB/RIF Assay to Determine Duration of Airborne Isolation in Hospitalized Patients Suspected of Pulmonary Tuberculosis.  ID-Week.  October 26-20, 2016  New Orleans, LA.  (poster accepted)

Published Multimedia

Nataro, JP, I Stephens, J.K. Johnson. Molecular Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases.Critical Conversations with Pediatric Experts. November 2010. 5(11) Interviewed, “New Test for Detecting Specific Flu Viruses”. Pediatric Press Fall 2010/Winter 2011 University of Maryland Hospital for Children, University of Maryland Medical Center.

Interviewed. A Quicker Test for Deadly Viruses in the Very Young. The Baltimore Sun.  Monday October 18, 2010. Pages 1 and 5.

Interviewed. WJZ TV. Monday October, 18, 2010. News at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 11 p.m.

Johnson, JK.  “A Case of Mistaken Identity” ASM Clinical Microbiology Mentoring Committee Case Report.  2015.  http://clinmicro.asm.org/index.php/explore-the-profession/what-is-clinical-microbiology/418-clinical-microbiology-case-studies-clinical-microbiology-case-studies

Complete List of Published Work in MyBibliography

Research Interests

Transmission of multidrug resistant organisms

Another significant contribution to science is the study of the transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms within the hospital environment. These studies suggest that transmission of resistant organisms occurs in the hospital setting and efforts to control spread should be focused on limiting patient-to-patient transmission.

Multidrug-resistant organisms are associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as healthcare costs. Patients colonized with these resistant organisms have been recognized as a potential reservoir for transmission to other patients. In these studies, we investigated ICU patients who were colonized with resistant organisms in their gastrointestinal track. We cultured peri-rectal swabs and used pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to assess whether organisms were identical. We also studied whether a prior room occupant with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli was a source of transmission. In these studies, we found that there was patient to patient transmission based on identical PFGE and overlapping hospital stay for ESBL K. pneumoniae and E. coli as well as imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After confirming patient to patient transmission for ESBL K. pneumoniae and E. coli, we investigated other avenues of transmission. We found that the contamination of the environment may not play a significant role in transmission of ESBL producing organisms. I have served as principle investigator or co-investigator on these studies.

  1. Harris A.D., M. Kotetishvili, S. Shurland, J.A. Johnson, J.G. Morris, L.L. Nemoy, J.K. Johnson. How Important is Patient-to-Patient Transmission in Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Escherichia coli Acquisition. 2007. Am J Infect Control. 35(10):97-101. PMID: 17327188
  2. Harris, A.D., E.N. Perencevich, J.K. Johnson, D.L. Patterson, J.G. Morris, S.M. Strauss, J.A. Johnson. Patient-to-Patient Transmission is Important in Extended Spectrum beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Acquisition. Clin Infect Dis. 2007. 45(10):1347-50. PMID: 17968833
  3. Johnson, J.K., G. Smith, M.S. Lee, R.A. Venezia, O.C. Stine, J.P. Nataro, W. Hsiao, A.D. Harris. The Role of Patient-to-Patient Transmission in the Acquisition of Imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Colonization in the Intensive Care Unit. 2009. J Infect Dis. 200(6): 900-5. PMID: 19673646
  4. Ajao AO, Johnson JK, Harris AD, Zhan M, McGregor JC, Thom KA, Furuno JP. Risk of Acquiring Extended-Spectrum Beta-lactamase-Producing Klebsiella Species and Escherichia coli from Prior Room Occupants in the Intensive Care Unit. 2013. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 34(5): 453-458. PMID: 23571360

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant pathogen in healthcare-associated infections in both acute care and long term care. Colonization with this organism often precedes infection making it necessary to determine patients that are colonized including those from the community. In order to do this it is necessary to know the body sites that are colonized the most. In the first, study, we found that anterior nares cultures will detect most people who are colonized with MRSA. In the second study, we sought to determine risk factors for colonization with MRSA. In this study we found that residents in rehabilitation care appear to be at higher risk and have different risk factors for acquisition of MRSA than those in residential care. In the third study we sought to assess transmission of S. aureus colonization in the community using the Old Order Amish community in Pennsylvania. This study suggested that transmission of colonization is limited to close contact in the community. In the last multi-center study, we examined whether the use of gloves and and gowns decreased the acquisition of MRSA or VRE in the ICU. We found that the intervention did reduce MRSA acquisition. I have served as principle investigator or co-investigator on these studies.

  1. Shurland, S.M., O.C. Stine, R.A. Venezia, J.K. Johnson, M. Zhan, J.P. Furuno, R.R. Miller, T. Johnson, M.C. Roghmann. Colonization Sites of USA300 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Extended Care Residents. 2009. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 30(4): 313-318. PMID: 19239380
  2. Furuno J.P., S.M. Shurland, M. Zhan, J.K. Johnson, R.A. Venezia, A.D. Harris, M.C. Roghmann. Comparison of the Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Acquisition among Rehabilitation and Nursing Home Residents. 2011. Infect Control and Hosp Epidemiol. 32(3); 244-9. PMID: 21460509
  3. Roghmann M.C., N. Longinaker, L. Croft, J.K. Johnson, A.D. Lydecker, O.C. Stine. Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization among the Old Order of Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA. Epidemiologyand Infection 2014 142(8); 1722-6. PMID: 24230465
  4. Harris A.D., L. Pineles, B. Belton, J.K. Johnson, M. Shardell, M. Loeb, R. Newhouse, L. Dembry, B. Braun, E.N. Perencevich, K.K. Hall, D.J., Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown (BUGG) Investigators. Universal Glove and Gown use and Acquisition of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in the ICU: A Randomized Trial. 2013. JAMA. 310(15): 1571-80. PMID: 24097234

Rapid Diagnostics

One of my most significant contributions to science has been the validation of rapid diagnostic tests along with antimicrobial stewardship within the hospital setting to decrease time to effective and optimal antibiotic therapy as well as provide cost savings. Rapid diagnostics testing is at the forefront of technology in the laboratory and has the ability to change the time in which results are received by physicians. Standard culture, which most laboratories use, can take several days for results, often leading to delayed appropriate antimicrobials. When any new technology is developed and implemented, it is important to evaluate the outcomes of this implementation as well as the accuracy of the technology. We examined two different technologies, PNA-FISH and the Verigene instrument, both of which provide rapid identification of organisms from blood culture. In these studies, we paired the results from the rapid tests with antimicrobial stewardship and analyzed cost savings. I have served as principle investigator or co-investigator on these studies.

  1. Forrest, G.N., S. Mehta, E. Weekes, D.P. Lincalis, J.K. Johnson, R.A. Venezia. Impact of Rapid In-situ Hybridization Testing on Coagulase Negative Staphylococci Positive Blood Cultures. 2006. J Antimicrob Chemother. 58(1):154-158. PMID: 16636084
  2. Forrest, G.N., K. Mankes, M.A. Jabra-Rizk, E. Weekes, J.K. Johnson, D.P. Lincalis, R.A. Venezia. Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence In-situ Hybridization-Based identification of Candida albicans and its Impact on Mortaility and Antifungal Therapy Costs. 2006. J Clin Microbiol. 44(9):3381-3. PMID: 16954279
  3. Forrest, G.N., M.C. Roghmann, L.S. Toombs, J.K. Johnson, E. Weeks, D.P. Lincalis, R.A. Venezia. Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence In-situ Hybridization for Hospital Acquired Enterococcal Bacteremia: Delivering Earlier Effective Antimicrobial Therapy. 2008. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 52(10):3558-63. PMID: 18663022
  4. Bork, J.T., S. Leekha, E.L. Heil, L. Zhao, R. Badamas, J.K. Johnson. Rapid Testing Using Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test in Combination with Antimicrobial Stewardship Intervention against Gram-Negative Bacteremia. 2015. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 59(3):1588-95. PMID: 25547353

Acinetobacter baumannii

A. baumannii has become a significant healthcare-associated pathogen with a high transmission rate that is difficult to treat due to its resistance to many antimicrobials. Through a series of studies we looked at the burden of A. baumannii within Maryland, investigated whether gloves and gowns are a potential reservoir of transmission of A. baumannii, and we studied whether transmission leads directly to infection or is established through colonization first. Lastly, we sought to discover whether invasive and colonization phenotypes have genomic differences that cause one to be more pathogenic. We found that colonization with A. baumannii and antimicrobial resistance is more common in long term care than in acute care. The high prevalence rate in this study suggested the need to increase efforts at reducing the transmission of A. baumannii. Also supporting the efforts at reducing transmission is the finding that patients are often colonized with A. baumannii before they become infected with this organism. We looked at the importance of contact precautions and donning gloves and gowns as a means of halting transmission of this organism. We found that the gloves and gowns used by healthcare workers as well as unwashed hands were often contaminated with A. baumannii and these organisms are highly variable genomically and have the capability to cause human disease irrespective of the isolation source. I have served as principle investigator or co-investigator on these studies.

  1. Thom KA, L.L Maragakis, K. Richards, J.K. Johnson, B. Roup, P. Lawson, A.D. Harris , E.P. Fuss, M.A. Pass, D. Blythe, E.N. Perencevich, L. Wilson, Maryland MDRO Prevention Collaborative. Assessing the Burden of Acinetobacter baumannii in Maryland: A Statewide Cross-sectional Period Prevalence Survey. 2012. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 33(9); 883-888. PMID: 22869261
  2. Thom K.A, W.W. Hsiao, A.D. Harris, O.C. Stine, D.A. Rasko, J.K. Johnson. Patients with Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream Infection are Colonized in the Gastrointestinal Tract with Identical Strains. 2010. Am J Infect Control, 38(9);751-3. PMID: 20570393
  3. Morgan D.J, S.Y. Liang, C.L. Smith, J.K. Johnson, A.D. Harris, J.P. Furuno, K.A. Thom, G.M. Snyder, H.R. Day, E.N. Perencevich. Frequent Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Contamination of Gloves, Gowns, and Hands of Healthcare Workers. 2010. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 31(7); 716-21. PMID: 20486855
  4. Sahl J.W., J.K. Johnson, A.D. Harris, A.M. Phillippy, W.W. Hsiao, K.A. Thom, D.A. Rasko. Genomic Comparison of Multi-drug Resistant Invasive and Colonizing Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Diverse Human Body Sites Reveals Genomic Plasticity. 2011. BMC Genomics.12:291. PMID: 21639920

Plasmid encoded resistances

Plasmids encoding multidrug resistant (MDR) genes such as extended-spectrum β-lactamases, AmpC β-lactamases, and carbapenemases play a role in the spread of resistance to other bacteria through horizontal transfer. Many of these MDR plasmids that carry β-lactamase genes belong to the Inc A/C incompatibility group which are large, self-mobilizable, and have a broad range of hosts. It is important to investigate the diversity and characterize these plasmids that cause so much resistance. We used comparative genomics to investigate the diversity of the IncA/C plasmid encoding FOX β-lactamase genes as well as characterizie the Klebsiella sp. and E.coli harboring these plasmids. To our knowledge, we were the first to sequence the FOX-5 AmpC β-lactamase as well as describe the first FOX-10 AmpC β-lactamase. Through whole genome sequencing, we demonstrated the genetic diversity of the organisms harboring the resistance plasmids as well as show that these plasmids are highly conserved. We also showed that whole genome sequencing can be used as a tool for investigating the vertical transmission of an organism, but also the horizontal transfer of the plasmids from organism to organism. I have served as principle investigator or co-investigator on these studies.

  1. Hazen T.H., L. Zhao, M.A. Boutin, A. Stancil, G. Robinson, A.D. Harris, D.A. Rasko, J.K. Johnson. Comparative Genomics of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella Isolates from ICU Patients and the Utility of Whole Genome Sequencing in Healthcare Settings. 2014. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 58(8):4814-25. PMID: 24914121
  2. Hazen T.H.,G.L. Robinson, A.D. Harris, D.A. Rasko, J.K. Johnson. Genome Sequence of Klebsiella oxytoca 11492-1, a Nosocomial Isolate Possessing a FOX-5 AmpC β-lactamase. 2012. J. Bacteriol. 194(11); 3028-29. PMID: 22582383
  3. Hazen T.H., L. Zhao, J.W. Sahl, G.L. Robinson, A.D. Harris, D.A. Rasko, J.K. Johnson. Characterization of Klebsiella sp. 10982, a Colonizer of Humans that Contains Novel Antibiotic Resistance Alleles and Exhibits Genetic Similarities to Plant and Clinical Klebsiella isolates. 2014. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 58(4):1879-88. PMID: 24395222
  4. Johnson, J.K., L.E. Wilson, L. Zhao, K. Richards, K.A. Thom, A.D. Harris. Point Prevalence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Maryland. 2014. Infect Contro Hosp Epidemiol. 35(4):443-5. PMID:24602955

Research Focus

My research focuses on bacterial resistance mechanisms focusing mainly on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and resistant mobile genetic elements in gram negatives including extended spectrum β-lactamases and plasmid mediated AMP-C β-lactamases.

Research Interests

My research interests include the use of molecular methodologies for the laboratory diagnoses of infectious diseases. As Director of the microbiology laboratory, I am interested in the use of real-time PCR to develop more accurate, cost-effective and timely laboratory tests. These tests can also aid in detection of antimicrobial resistance, another area of interest. Antimicrobial resistance of interest include Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and resistant mobile genetic elements in gram negatives including extended spectrum β-lactamases and plasmid mediated AMP-C β-lactamases.

Awards and Affiliations

Professional Society Memberships

  • 1997-Present: National and Maryland Branch of American Society of Microbiology
  • 2006-Present: Pan American Society of Clinical Virology
  • 2008-Present: Association of Molecular Pathology
  • 2013-Present: Society of Healthcare Epidemiology

Honors and Awards

  • 1999: Excellence in Microbiology Award, University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Medical and Research Technology
  • 2000-2001: Merit Scholarship Award, University of Maryland Dental School
  • 2000-2002: NIH National Research Service Award Training Program
  • 2011: Richard S. Schwalbe Award, American Society of Microbiology, Maryland Branch

Grants and Contracts

Active Grants

10/01/11 - 03/31/17 Role: Co-Investigator (10%) PI: M.C. Roghmann
(NCE) “Metagenomic Studies of MRSA Colonization
Veterans Health Administration CSR&D
Total Direct Costs: $508,781
Total Indirect Costs: $0
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.

07/01/12 - 12/31/17 Role: Co-Investigator (10%) PI: M.C. Roghmann
(NCE) “Modifying Isolation Precautions for MRSA in Non-acute Care
Settings
VA Merit Grant Health Services R&D
RII10-154
Total Direct Costs: $1,035,459
Total Indirect Costs: $0
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.

04/01/14 - 03/31/16 Role: Co-Investigator (5%) PI: K. Kotloff
(NCE) “Incidence, Mode of Transmission, and Sequelae of Community-Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the Effectiveness of Decolonization”
NIH VTEU
Direct Costs: $822,310
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.

08/01/15 - 07/31/19 Role: Co-Investigator (5%) PI: Thom
Removing barriers to hand hygiene and glove compliance: Evaluation of two novel time-efficient interventions
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
R01 HS024108-01
Direct and Indirect cost: $1,571,807
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.

09/30/15 - 12/29/16 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
Sentinel Site Surveillance for AR Organisms II
CDC-SHEPheRD Program Contract RFTOP 2015-008
Direct Cost: $78,500
Indirect Cost: $20,500

9/15/15-9/14/17 Role: Co-investigator (10%) PI: Cross
Development of a multivalent vaccine to prevent invasive infections and colonization with Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Nosocimial Vaccine Company
Total Direct Costs: $3, 239,933
Provide bacterial strains and expertise in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

09/30/15 - 09/29/18 Role: Co-investigator (10%) PI: Harris
Epicenters for the Prevention of Healthcare Associated Infections (HAI) - Cycle II
Centers for Disease Control
1U54CK0000450-01
Direct and Indirect cost: $1,432,368
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.

10/01/15-3/31/18 Role: Co-investigator (10%) PI: Harris
“Does Universal Glove and Gown use decrease carbapenem-resistance Gram-negative bacteria”
AHRQ R18 HS024045
Total Directs: $770,800
Total Indirects: $417,310
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.

03/01/16-02/28/18 Role: Co-Investigator (10%) PI: M.C. Roghmann
“Transmission of Antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative Bacteria in Nursing Homes.”
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
R03-A1-122223
Total Direct Costs: $153,000
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.

09/01/2016-08/31-17 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
“Understanding the workflow of positive blood cultures from sampling to results.”
Q-Linea
Direct Costs: $9,999

8/10/16-07/31/2020 Role: Co-Investigator (10%) PI: Harris
“Epidemiology of CRE and MRSA transmission: patient and organism factors”
NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
1R01AL121146-01
Total Directs: $1,800,599
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.

09/15/16-11/14/17 Role: Co-Principal Investigator (10%)
“Identification of Microbial disruption indices (MDI) predictive of colonization and dominance by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. “
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
BAA 2016-N-17812
Total Costs: $459,721
Total Indirects: $606,837

Pending Grants

10/01/16-09/30/17 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
“A Clinical Evaluation of a Gastrointestinal Infection panel Assay system (ACEGIS)”
Applied BioCode
Total Cost: $100,000

04/1/17-03/31/22 Role: Sub-award PI (10%) PI: Bachman
“Integrated modeling of Klebsiella pneumoniae infections based on bacterial genotype, patient factors and colonization status”
NIH R01 AI 125307 01 A1
NIH-DHHS-US
Total Cost: $312,770 sub award
Total Cost: $2,713,340

Completed Grants

09/01/05 - 07/31/12 Role: Investigator/Scholar (75%) PI: A.R. Shuldiner
Transmission of Plasmid Mediated AmpC β-lactamases”
University of Maryland Multidisciplinary Research Career Development Program (MCRDP)
NIH K12RR023250
Total Direct Costs: $12,309,704

06/01/07 - 11/01/07 Role: PI (5%)
“Culture results for patients with positive blood cultures”
AdvanDx
Total Direct Costs: $3,000

08/01/07 - 07/31/08 Role: PI (75%)
“Understanding Resistance Mechanisms in Fecal Microorganisms”
University of Maryland GCRC
Total Direct Costs: $10,000

09/30/07 - 09/29/08 Role: Co-Investigator (in kind/mentor) PI: K Kreisel
“Risk Factors and Outcomes of Infections Due to USA300 Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus”
CDC R36 Grant for Public Health Research Dissertation
Program Announcement PAR-07-231
Total Direct Costs: $35,000

10/22/07 - 12/31/07 Role: PI (15%)
“BacLite for the detection of MRSA”
3M Medical Diagnostics
Total Direct Costs: $40,000

07/01/08 - 06/30/09 Role: Co-PI (5%) PI: R. Venezia
“Detection of MRSA from Blood Cultures”
Microphage
Total Direct Costs: $21,000

02/01/10 - 02/01/11 Role: PI (5%)
“Clinical Validation of the Molecular-based BD GeneOhm VanR assay for the presumptive identification of vancomycin resistant Enterococci in perianal and/or rectal specimens”
Becton Dickinson
Total Direct Costs: $75,000

04/15/10 - 07/31/11 Role: Site PI (in kind/mentor) PI: M. Schweizer
Linezolid Therapy and Outcomes in Patients with Post-Influenza Staphylococcus aureus Pneumonia, Controlling for Patient, Pathogen, and Treatment Characteristics
Pfizer

06/01/10 - 11/30/13 Role: Co-Investigator (5%) PI: A.D. Harris
“Epidemiology of emerging pathogens among hospitalized patients”
2R01AI060859-05 Renewal
Direct Costs: $900,000
Indirect Costs: $436,500
Total Direct Costs: $100,000

06/28/10 - 12/01/11 Role: Co-Investigator (5%) PI: K Thom
Maryland MDR Acinetobacter Prevalence Survey
3U50CI000485 Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Direct Costs: $178,000

07/26/10 - 07/25/12 Role: Co-Investigator (5%) PI: J. Furuno
“Using Nursing Home Antibiograms to Improve Antibiotic Prescribing and Delivery”
AHRQ HHSA290200600020I
Direct Costs: $621,298

08/16/10 - 08/14/13 Role: Co-Investigator (5%) PI: A.D. Harris
“Novel Interventions to Decrease Healthcare Associated Infections”
AHRQ (Choice)
Direct Costs: $1,064,827

03/01/11 - 02/28/15 Role: Co-Investigator (5%) PI: M.C. Roghmann
Human Microbiome and Healthcare-associated Infections”
National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
R01
Total Direct Costs: $1,134,557
Total Indirect Costs: $567,279

08/01/11 - 07/31/14 Role: Co-Investigator (10%) PI: M.C. Roghmann
“Modifying Isolation Precautions for MRSA in Long Care Setting
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Total Direct Costs: $1,012,297
Total Indirect Costs: $338,262

10/01/11 - 09/30/12 Role: PI (no salary for PI)
Drug Resistant Gram Negative Microorganisms in VA Long Term Care Facilities
Baltimore Research and Education Foundation, Inc.
Total Direct Cost: $19,500

01/31/12 - 02/01/14 Role: PI (10%)
A novel agent to decrease contamination of hospital scrubs
BioMed Protect Inc.
Total Direct Costs: $80, 845
Total Indirect Costs: $43, 252
The contract is with the UMB SOM Center for Clinical Trials.

08/01/12 - 07/31/13 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
“Clinical Evaluation of the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification System”
Idaho Technologies
Direct Costs: $90,451
Indirect Costs: $42,964

08/01/12 - 07/31/14 Role: Principal Investigator (10%)
“Development of a PCR Assay for the detection of MRSA”
Maryland Industrial Partnership (MIPS)
Direct Costs: $87, 948
Indirect costs: $16,468

12/10/12 - 07/31/14 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
“Bacterial Identification and Susceptibility Reference Testing of Gram-negative Blood Culture Project”
Nanosphere
Direct Costs: $245,700
Indirect Costs: $105,300

02/01/13 - 02/28/14 Role: Co-Investigator of project (no salary support) PI: Fraser-Liggett
Contract/grant#: HHSN272200900009C
“Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases”
Project Title: Comparative genomics and transcriptomics to identify genetic mechanisms underlying the emergence of carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb)
National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

09/15/13 - 09/14/14 Role: Co-Investigator (10%) PI: R Christenson
Specimen Acquisition for Hepatitis Evaluations”
Roche
Direct Costs: $138,347.30
Indirect Costs: $35,970.30

10/01/13 - 01/30/16 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
Sentinel Site Surveillance for AR Organisms
CDC-SHEPheRD Program Contract RFTOP 2013-001
Direct Cost: $78,500
Indirect Cost: $20,500

11/08/13 - 10/31/15 Role: Co-PI (10%) PI: Harris, AD
Risk factors for Pseudomonas on ICU admission and Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas on admission”
Cubist
Direct Costs: $110, 847.18
Indirect Costs: $27,711.80

01/14/14 - 01/13/15 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Test:Rapid identification of Gram-negative Organisms and resistance in blood stream infections
Nanosphere
Direct Costs: $28, 192
Indirect Costs: $8, 457.60

04/24/14 - 04/23/15 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
High Risk MDRO Gene Panel Beta Performance Evaluation”
OpGen
Direct Costs: $59,389
Indirect Costs: $17,817

05/06/14 - 05/05/15 Role: Principal Investigator (2%)
Clinical Evaluation of the FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis Panel”
Bio-Fire Diagnostics
Direct Costs: $39,000
Indirect Costs: $11,700

Professional Activity

  • 1996-1997 Research Biologist, Toxicology Division, Toxicology Evaluation Branch, US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine
  • 1998-2002 Research Biologist, Pharmacology Division, Biochemical Pharmacology Branch, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense
  • 1998-2002 Teaching Assistant, University of Maryland, Baltimore
  • 2003 Scientist-Section Head of the Rapid Diagnostics: Bioterrorism Response Section, State of Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
  • 2003-2006 Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology
  • 2006-2012 Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Department of Pathology (primary appointment)

Positions and Honors

Positions

  • 2006-2014 Associate Director of Clinical Microbiology, University of Maryland Medical Center
  • 2007-present VA Research Health Scientist (WOC), Baltimore Veterans Administration
  • 2011-2012 Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology an dPublic Health University of MarylandSchool of Medicine (Secondary appointment)
  • 2012-present Associate Professor, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine(Primary appointment)
  • 2012-Present Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health University of MarylandSchool of Medicine (Secondary appointment)
  • 2013-Present Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology University of MarylandSchool of Medicine (Secondary appointment)
  • 2014-2015 Interim Director of Clinical Microbiology, University of Maryland Medical Center
  • 2015-present Director of Clinical Microbiology, University of Maryland Medical Center

Honors

  • 1998-2002 Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Engineering Fellowship
  • 1999 Excellence in Microbiology Award, University of Maryland, School of Medicine
  • 2000-2001 Merit Scholarship Award, University of Maryland, Baltimore
  • 2000-2002 NIH T32-DE07309 Training Program
  • 2011 Richard S. Schwalbe Award, American Society of Microbiology, Maryland Branch

Ongoing Research Support

Centers for Disease Control Harris(PI) 09/30/2015 – 09/29/2018
1U54CK0000450-01
Epicenters for the Prevention of Healthcare Associated Infections (HAI) - Cycle II
The CDC is expanding the number of epicenters from 5 to 10. This application is for the University of Maryland to become a CDC-EPI Center. This research group is a leader in the field of healthcare-associated infection and transmission of infectious pathogens, with over 160 publications in these areas. In this proposal we describe four aim that address transmission of bacteria and virus in the healthcare setting as well as novel strategies aimed at reducing transmission.
Role: Co-investigator

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Thom (PI) 8/01/2015 – 7/31/2019
R01 HS024108-01
Removing barriers to hand hygiene and glove compliance: evaluation of two novel time-efficient interventions
This is a 4-year R01 from AHRQ to investigate novel strategies of hand hygiene and glove compliance under conditions when gloves are worn. A randomized cluster trial of directly gloving (compared to performing hand hygiene and then donning gloves) when non-sterile gloves are worn will be undertaken to determine whether this strategy results in improvements in compliance with infection prevention strategies of hand hygiene and glove complianceRole: Co-investigator

CDC-SHEPheRD Program Contract RFTOP 2015-008 Johnson (PI) 9/30/2015 - 12/29/2016
4100126A 200-2011-42064
Sentinel Site Surveillance for AR Organisms II
This proposal will collect both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria from across the US to determine the type of bacteria known to cause hospital associated infections.
Role: PI

NIH Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEU) Kotloff, Karen (PI) 04/01/2014 - 06/30/2016
Incidence, Mode of Transmission, and Sequelae of Community-Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the Effectiveness of Decolonization
This proposal will compare infants with MRSA who have been colonized and decolonized with mupirocin in an effort to understand incidence and transmission.
Role: Co-investigator

VA Health Services R&D Roghmann(PI) 07/01/2012 - 06/30/2016
IIR10-154
Modifying Isolation Precautions for MRSA in Non-acute Care Settings
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.
Role: Co-investigator

VA Clinical Science R&D Roghmann(PI) 04/01/2012 – 06/30/2016
Metagenomic Studies of MRSA Colonization
CX000491-01A1
Direct laboratory work and personnel and review, interpret, analyze, and publish data.
Role: Co-investigator