Skip to main content

Dr. Tracy Bale Elected President of the International Brain Research Organization

September 25, 2019

Tracy L. Bale, PhD

Tracy L. Bale, PhD, Professor of Pharmacology and Director of the Center for Epigentic Research in Child Health & Brain Development has been elected President of the International Brain Research Organization.

IBRO is the global federation of neuroscience organizations established in 1961 that aims to promote and support neuroscience around the world through training, teaching, research, outreach and engagement activities, and the publication of our two journals, Neuroscience and IBRO Reports. More than 90 international, regional and national scientific organizations constitute IBRO’s Governing Council which, together with the IBRO Executive Committee and five Regional Committees, address the needs and advance the work of individual scientists and research communities everywhere.

In addition, IBRO has partnerships with like-minded scientific societies and organizations to identify priorities and help bridge gaps in knowledge, investment and resources in the field of brain research.

The IBRO Mission is to:

  • develop, support, coordinate and promote scientific research in all fields concerning the brain
  • promote international collaboration and exchange of scientific information on brain research throughout the world
  • provide for and assist in education and dissemination of information relating to brain research

"IBRO’s mission to foster neuroscience research throughout the world is admirable. But it is also a challenging opportunity as the global landscape continues to shift. How IBRO positions itself to remain focused on action items and pushing its mission will determine the neuroscience community’s broad success," said Dr. Bale.

"The President of IBRO is the face of this force, and it is my passion to ensure that all available funding, training, education and resources that are critical toward this mission make it into the international communities in need, and that the developing neuroscience programs largely being driven forward by existing and new initiatives receive the mentorship and guidance to ensure their success," added Dr. Bale.

 

Contact

Office of Public Affairs
655 West Baltimore Street
Bressler Research Building 14-002
Baltimore, Maryland 21201-1559

Contact Media Relations
(410) 706-5260

Related stories

    Monday, April 29, 2019

    UMSOM’s Reading on the Brain Program Teaches Baltimore City Elementary Students About the Brain-Building Power of Reading

    Acting Baltimore City Mayor Jack Young joined 4th and 5th grade students at Callaway Elementary School to help paint a mural about the brain. It was all part of Reading on the Brain, a University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) program to teach young students about the importance of reading and how reading can stimulate brain development and inspire future success. Tracy Bale, PhD, is leading the pilot program, which also emphasizes science and helps children to understand how the brain works.


    Thursday, March 28, 2019

    Allergic Reactions Play Role in Sexual Behavior Development in Unborn Males and Females, UMSOM Research Shows

    Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and colleagues at Ohio State University have discovered that allergic reactions trigger changes in brain behavior development in unborn males and females. This latest brain development discovery will ultimately help researchers better understand how neurological conditions can differ between men and women.


    Friday, March 01, 2019

    UMSOM Researchers Discover Clues to Brain Differences Between Males and Females

    Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have discovered a mechanism for how androgens -- male sex steroids -- sculpt brain development. The research, conducted by Margaret M. McCarthy, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology and Chair of the Department of Pharmacology, could ultimately help researchers understand behavioral development differences between males and females.


    Thursday, December 07, 2017

    University of Maryland School of Medicine Scientists Identify the First Brain Cells to Respond to Sound

    Some expectant parents play classical music for their unborn babies, hoping to boost their children’s cognitive capacity. While some research supports a link between prenatal sound exposure and improved brain function, scientists had not identified any structures responsible for this link in the developing brain.