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UM School of Medicine's Institute for Genome Sciences Awarded $17.5 Million Grant for Infectious Disease Research

April 04, 2019

David Rasko, PhD

The IGS Genome Center for Infectious Diseases is Funded for Five Additional Years

The Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) was awarded $17.5 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to fund the IGS Genome Center for Infectious Diseases (GCID) for another five years.

The Principal Investigator and Administrative Core Director for the grant, which is titled “A Genomics Based Investigation of the Determinants of Polymicrobial Infectious Disease Outcomes,” is David Rasko, PhD, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and Scientist at IGS. Principal Investigators will include: Claire M. Fraser, PhD, the Dean’s Endowed Professor of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, and Director of IGS, and Owen R. White, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health, Director of Bioinformatics and Associate Director of IGS.,

Claire M. Fraser, PhDThe GCID uses large-scale genomics and bioinformatics approaches to investigate pathogen biology, virulence, immune evasion, microbe-microbe interactions as well as host-microbiome interactions. Scientific research projects focus on host/microbe interrelationships of diverse bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The interdisciplinary team will participate in the GCID research, including internationally recognized faculty from the Institute for Genome Sciences, the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the UMSOM Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD) and their long-standing collaborators.

“The GCID team has been in the forefront of applying genomic techniques to advance scientific understanding of infectious disease agents for the past 15 years, and this NIAID grant renewal will allow us to further deploy genomics approaches in the study of host-pathogen-microbiome interactions,” said Dr. Fraser.

Owen R. White, PhDThe NIAID grant will support research programs that focus on three areas. One research area involves studying the interactions of multiple bacteria with each other as well as the host and associated microbiome, which is led by Dr. Rasko, Dr. Fraser, and Herve S.G. Tettelin, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and Scientist at IGS.. The second area includes research into the genomic and transcriptomic analysis of fungal pathogens interacting with the host, which will be led by Vincent M. Bruno, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and Scientist at IGS. The third area of research includes an integrated genomics research project in parasitic tropical diseases that will be led by Julie C. Dunning Hotopp, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and Scientist at IGS, David Serre, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and Scientist at IGS; and Joana C. Silva, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and Scientist at IGS

“This grant allows us to integrate the study of multiple pathogens in model systems and with human samples in a way that is more representative of natural infection processes, which will provide greater understanding and more in-depth insights into these interactions,” said Dr. Rasko.

The center also supports a Technology Core, a Data Management Core and an Administrative Core. The projects include whole genome and targeted genome sequencing, transcriptome profiling by RNA-seq, rRNA community profiling, and metagenomics and metatranscriptomic sequencing with a focus on the interactions of microbes with each other, the host and the resident microbiome. The sequencing will be performed using multiple platforms, including the Illumina MiSeq and HiSeq, Oxford Nanopore Technology and the Pacific Biosciences systems.

“Integrating genomics with diagnostic and clinical medicine has advanced our biological understanding of diseases and health,” says E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, Vice President for Medical Affairs at the University of Maryland, and John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor and Dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “This NIAID grant will foster new collaborations across disciplines within the clinical and research centers in the School of Medicine, as well as with international infectious disease communities.”

In addition to the research projects, IGS will establish workshops and continue educational initiatives to expand the understanding of how to apply genomics to high priority research questions that impact global health.

IGS has previously received grants as a Genome Center for Infectious Diseases (GCID) an NIAID-funded five-year grant (2014-2019); a Genome Sequencing Center for Infectious Diseases (GSCID); an NIAID-funded five-year contract (2009-2014), and the lead investigators have also had Principal Investigator roles with the NIAID-funded Microbial Sequencing Center (MSC), a five-year contract (2004-2009). This U19 grant with number U19 AI110820 will run for five years until 2024, representing twenty years of cutting edge research in genomic sciences.

About the University of Maryland School of Medicine

Now in its third century, the University of Maryland School of Medicine was chartered in 1807 as the first public medical school in the United States. It continues today as one of the fastest growing, top-tier biomedical research enterprises in the world -- with 43 academic departments, centers, institutes, and programs; and a faculty of more than 3,000 physicians, scientists, and allied health professionals, including members of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences, and a distinguished recipient of the Albert E. Lasker Award in Medical Research.  With an operating budget of more than $1 billion, the School of Medicine works closely in partnership with the University of Maryland Medical Center and Medical System to provide research-intensive, academic and clinically based care for more than 1.2 million patients each year. The School has over 2,500 students, residents, and fellows, and more than $530 million in extramural funding, with most of its academic departments highly ranked among all medical schools in the nation in research funding. As one of the seven professional schools that make up the University of Maryland, Baltimore campus, the School of Medicine has a total workforce of nearly 7,000 individuals. The combined School and Medical System (“University of Maryland Medicine”) has an annual budget of nearly $6 billion and an economic impact more than $15 billion on the state and local community. The School of Medicine faculty, which ranks as the 8th highest among public medical schools in research productivity, is an innovator in translational medicine, with 600 active patents and 24 start-up companies. The School works locally, nationally, and globally, with research and treatment facilities in 36 countries around the world. Visit medschool.umaryland.edu

About the Institute for Genome Sciences

The Institute for Genome Sciences, founded in 2007, is an international research center within the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Comprised of an interdisciplinary, multidepartment team of investigators, the Institute uses the powerful tools of genomics and bioinformatics to understand genome function in health and disease, to study molecular and cellular networks in a variety of model systems, and to generate data and bioinformatics resources of value to the international scientific community.
igs.umaryland.edu

Contact

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Bressler Research Building 14-002
Baltimore, Maryland 21201-1559

Contact Media Relations
(410) 706-5260

Joanne Morrison
Director of Marketing and Public Relations
Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health
University of Maryland School of Medicine
jmorrison@som.umaryland.edu
Office: (410) 706-2884
Mobile: (202) 841-3369

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