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  • Diagnosing, preventing, treating, controlling, eliminating and eradicating diseases of global impact

  • Conducting innovative, world-leading research in Baltimore and overseas

  • Collaborating with other UMSOM Institutes, Centers, Departments and Programs, and other UMB and University of Maryland System Schools

  • Training and educating leaders in global health

Institute for Global Health (IGH)

About the IGH

The IGH, established in 2015 at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is dedicated to improving global health by conducting innovative, world-leading research in Baltimore and around the world.

Led by Founding Director Christopher Plowe, MD, MPH, FASTMH, the institute develops new and improved ways of diagnosing, preventing, treating, controlling, and eradicating diseases of global impact. Currently, these diseases include malaria, Ebola, and vaccine-preventable infectious diseases such as measles. The IGH plans to expand to relevant non-communicable diseases as well.

Dr. Chris Plowe presents talk, "New progress for artemisinin resistance surveillance in Asia" on June 17, 2016 at the 3rd Symposium on Surveillance Response System Leading to Tropical Diseases Elimination in Shanghai, P.R. China.

Dr. Chris Plowe presents a talk, "New progress for artemisinin resistance surveillance in Asia" on June 17, 2016 at The 3rd Symposium on Surveillance Response System Leading to Tropical Diseases Elimination in Shaghai, P.R. China.

Currently, the institute includes the Center for Vaccine Development (CVD), directed by Kathleen Neuzil, MD, MPH, who also serves as Deputy Director of IGH, and the Division of Malaria Research, directed by Dr. Plowe. Under the Institute umbrella, CVD continues its 40-year mission to develop, test and deploy vaccines against infectious diseases that will aid the world's underserved population. Former CVD Director Myron M. Levine, MD, DTPH is a senior advisor to the IGH, and Associate Dean for Global Health, Vaccinology and Infectious Diseases.

The new Division of Malaria Research performs the crucial work needed to support global malaria eradication. That work, led by Dr. Plowe, includes developing and deploying innovative tools for improved malaria treatment, prevention and surveillance. The IGH is an instrumental partner in a new international initiative to eliminate malaria in Myanmar.

With more than 30 faculty physicians and scientists, the IGH collaborates with other School of Medicine institutes, centers, departments and programs, as well as other schools on campus, and other entities within the University System of Maryland.

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Christopher V. Plowe, MD, MPH, FASTMH
IGH Founding Director

IGH News

  • Myron Levine, MD, DTPH, Simon and Bessie Grollman Distinguished Professor of Medicine and UMSOM's Associate Dean for Global Health, Vaccinology and Infectious Diseases, receives the prestigious 2017 Maxwell Finland Award for Scientific Achievement, given by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID)
  • FDA Approves Vaccine for Cholera Invented and Developed at University of Maryland School of Medicine
  • The Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) and CVD-Mali hosted the 10th African Rotavirus Symposium in Bamako, Mali
  • Myron Levine, MD, DTPH, and his work on cholera challenge studies and cholera vaccines featured in May 20, 2016 Science story, The Truest Test  
  • Myaing Nyunt, MD, MPH, PhD is featured in the April 22 issue of Science in the article The Unlikely Diplomat, part of a feature series on Malaria.  
  • Christopher Plowe, MD, MPH, FASTMN was quoted in a feature story about drug resistant malaria in Southeast Asia, Malaria Wars in the April 22, 2016 issue of Science.  Malaria Wars
  • Skirmishing Over the Scope of the Threat
  • New Institute for Global Health at University of Maryland School of Medicine helps Organize Historic Summit to Address Malaria Epidemic in Myanmar
  • ASTMH Science Diplomacy: Q&A with Chris Plowe and Myaing Nyunt. The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
  • Roll Call Online: Malaria as a Catalyst for Change in Myanmar | Commentary