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Immune Roadmap to Understanding Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)

As part of the NIH response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the newly recognized MIS-C, the Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is sponsoring a virtual workshop entitled, “The Immune Roadmap to Understanding MISC”, on Wednesday, June 24th, 2020 from 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM. The goal of the workshop is to inform NIAID of critical questions and scientific approaches to understanding the immunopathology of MIS-C. The agenda for this meeting is attached and the ZOOM link is below.

Join ZoomGov Meeting:
https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1616196440
Meeting ID: 161 619 6440

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What’s Scaring the Pediatricians?

Children are not the focus of the pandemic. But pediatricians are worried for children and families, for now and for the future. A top worry that come up again and again from those whose business is children and children’s health: Missing immunizations and falling immunization rates.


Baltimore, Put Your Mask On!

In the wake of COVID-19, Be More Open created this video to have fun and encourage everyone to stay safe.


Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Treatment Guidelines

These Treatment Guidelines have been developed to inform clinicians how to care for patients with COVID-19. Because clinical information about the optimal management of COVID-19 is evolving quickly, these Guidelines will be updated frequently as published data and other authoritative information becomes available.


CDC Weekly Report Describes COVID-19 in US Children

US CDC report on the epidemiology of COVID-19 through April 2, 2020. There were 2,572 cases of COVID-19 in children. One third (32%) occurred in ages 15-17 years. Known exposure to household or community contact with COVID-19 in 91%. Half reported fever (56%) and/or cough (54%) as a symptom (which is less common than reported by adults). Hospitalization status is known for 745 of these children, 20% of whom were hospitalized (but 5.7% of the total cases including those with incomplete information). Children under 1 year had the highest rates of hospitalization (15–62%). Underlying condition information known in 345 children; of those 23% had one underlying condition, most commonly chronic lung (including asthma). There have been 3 pediatric deaths in the US.


Mask Safety 101: Why You Shouldn’t Mask a Baby

As the coronavirus pandemic evolves, so do the recommendations. One of the most recent recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is to wear “cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.” However, it is extremely important to note that the CDC specifically states that “cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.”


COVID-19: A Child’s Perspective

Johns Hopkins Medicine is offering a complimentary webcast from 7-8 pm featuring pediatric psychiatrist Hal Kronberg, MD and pediatrician Rachel Thornton, MD, as they discuss COVID-19: A Child’s Perspective.

Following their remarks, Drs. Kronberg and Thornton will address your questions about the risks of the pandemic, importance of maintaining wellness, how to talk with your children about the disease and social isolation and potential behavioral changes.

REGISTER HERE


My Hero is You
How kids can fight COVID-19

The World Health Organization, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and other global agencies just launched a children's book aimed at helping kids ages 6-11 learn how to protect themselves against Covid-19, but also manage the complex emotions they may be dealing with amid the uncertainty that the crisis has brought. 


Maryland Coronavirus (COVID-19) Rumor Control

The purpose of this page is to help Marylanders distinguish between rumors and facts regarding the response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Rumors can easily circulate within communities during a crisis. Do your part to the stop the spread of disinformation by doing 3 easy things; don’t believe the rumors, don’t pass them along and go to trusted sources of information to get the facts about the state of Maryland's (COVID-19) response.


CDC Weekly Report on COVID-19 in Children up to April 2, 2020

US CDC report on the epidemiology of COVID-19 through April 2, 2020. There were 2,572 cases of COVID-19 in children. One third (32%) occurred in ages 15-17 years. Known exposure to household or community contact with COVID-19 in 91%. Half reported fever (56%) and/or cough (54%) as a symptom, less frequent than in adults. Hospitalization status is known for only 745 of these children, 20% of which were hospitalized (which is 5.7% of the total cases, including those with incomplete information). Children under 1 year had the highest rates of hospitalization (15–62%). Underlying condition information known in 345 children; of those 23% had one underlying condition, most commonly chronic lung disease (including asthma). There have been 3 known pediatric deaths in the US in children infected with SARS-CoV-2.


Coronavirus is not the flu. It's worse.

Very informative and easy to understand video from Vox on how COVID-19 is different from the flu.


Initial Guidance: Management of Infants Born to Mothers with COVID-19

On 2 Apr 20202, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released initial guidance on infants born to mothers with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. 

The report and Q&A cover precautions for birth attendants, rooming-in, breastfeeding, testing, neonatal intensive care, visitation, and hospital discharge. 


Is There Evidence of Vertical Transmission of COVID-19?

Four recent papers present preliminary evidence supporting, but not definitively proving, the possibility of vertical transmission of SARS CoV-2: two papers present cases of neonates with positive IgG and IgM for SARS CoV-2, but negative PCR tests, and one presents neonates with evidence of early-onset COVID-19 disease. The fourth paper is an editorial that cautions diagnosing congenital infections, including COVID-19, using IgM. Infants were either asymptomatic or had mild to moderate disease. Further evidence is needed to understand whether SARS CoV-2 can be transmitted vertically.


Wash Your Hands with Baby Shark

Hey moms and dads, grandmas and grandpas, and kids of all ages: Even Baby Shark stays safe from COVID-19.


A Kids’ Guide to Coronavirus

“Can my dog get the virus?” “What color is coronavirus?” and other insightful questions. The answers, though, are informative and entertaining for both kids and adults (and even pediatric infectious disease doctors!). A must listen if you have about 25 minutes.

The Daily on Apple Podcasts


How is COVID-19 Affecting Children? 

What is the impact of COVID-19 on children? Are COVID-19 symptoms different in children than in adults? Are the risks higher for very young children? Is there any lasting damage? Professor Karen Kotloff of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, a specialist in infectious disease and pediatrics, will give a brief talk and answer reporters' questions on the subject of the novel coronavirus and its impact on children.

Karen Kotloff, MD
Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Division Head, Pediatric-Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine


COVID-19: Chloroquine Toxicity

The total amount of chloroquine that adults are being prescribed for a course of post-exposure prophylaxis is fatal in a child, if he/she were to accidentally ingest it. It is very important for parents to know that the drug can be very dangerous for children if adult doses are inadvertently taken. The drug must be kept in child-proof containers and carefully kept out of reach. All medicines, especially dangerous ones like chloroquine, should be stored up, away, and out of sight in a cabinet where a child cannot reach them.

Elizabeth Hines, MD
Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Assistant Medical Director of the Maryland Poison Center