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Terry B. Rogers, PhD

Associate Dean for Research Development & Administration

Academic Title:

Professor

Primary Appointment:

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Secondary Appointment(s):

Administration

Administrative Title:

Associate Dean for Research Development & Administration

Location:

655 West Baltimore Street

Phone (Primary):

(410) 706-8727

Education and Training

  • Cornell University, BA, Chemistry, 1970
  • University of California, Davis, MS, Agricultural Chemistry, 1974
  • University of California, Davis, PhD, Biochemistry
  • University of Nice Medical School, France, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Cell Biology, 1979
  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Neuroscience, 1980

Biosketch

Dr. Rogers is a leading biochemist and research scientist who is recognized for his key discoveries in cardiac cell biology and signal transduction. 

In research long-funded by the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Rogers has contributed greatly to our understanding of the fundamental molecular and electrical properties of cardiac cells, focusing on intracellular signaling pathways that underlie the precise physiological control of Ca2+ signaling in the heart and how these processes are disrupted in heart failure. In 1984, he discovered a functional high affinity angiotensin II receptor on cardiac myocytes and subsequently characterized the signaling cascades that underlie the increases in the Ca transient, the L-type Ca current and the positive effect on contractility mediated by this receptor. He has also studied stress activated signaling pathways that can lead to cardiac pathologies.  More recently, he has broadened his interests—combining biochemistry, molecular biology, Ca imaging, and electrophysiology—delving into the role of stem cell biology/signaling in a protective response of heart cells to stress.

Dr. Rogers has been active throughout his career in mentoring many PhD and MD/PhD students. Notably, for 16 years he was the Director of our MD-PhD Program that was funded by NIH with Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) T32 grant. He recruited some 90 students during this time and mentored many at every step of the way through graduation and into Residency programs. The MSTP had 24% underrepresented minority (URM) census (national average was 9%) with 100% graduation rate during his tenure.  Currently he is a a co-Principal Investigator -PI on a NIGMS R25 Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) that offers support and mentoring for URMs that seek to matriculate into PhD and MD/PhD programs.

 

Research/Clinical Keywords

Signal Transduction, Protein Chemistry, Membrane Receptor Biochemistry, Cardiac Cells, Intracellular Signaling, Calcium Signaling, Cardiac Cell Regulation, Inflammatory Signaling Pathways, Stem Cell Biology/Signaling, Stress Response Pathways, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Functional Signal Transduction Cascades in Normal and Failing/Dysfunctional Hearts, Protein Phosphorylation/Dephosphorylation.

Highlighted Publications

  • Rogers, TB (1984) High affinity angiotensin II receptors in myocardial sarcolemmal membrane: Characterization of receptors and covalent linkage of angiotensin II to a membrane component of 116,000 daltons. Journal of Biological Chemistry 259, 8106 – 8114.
  • Rogers, T. B. and A. J. Lokuta. (1994) Angiotensin II signal transduction pathways in the cardiovascular system. Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine 4, 110-116.
  • duBell, WH, Rogers, TB (2004) Protein phosphatase 1 and an opposing protein kinase regulate steady-state L-type Ca current in mouse cardiac myocytes. Journal of Physiology 556, 79 – 93.
  • Hall G and Rogers TB. Regulating the regulator: NF-kB signaling in heart. (2006) J Molecular and Cellular Cardiology 41, 580-591.
  • Goodall MH, Wardlow RD, Goldblum RR, Ziman A, Lederer WJ, Randall W, Rogers TB. (2010) Novel function of cardiac protein kinase D as a dynamic regulator of Ca2+ sensitivity of contraction. Journal of Biological Chemistry 285 , 41686-416700
  • Rogers, TB, Pati, S, Gaa, S, Riley, D, Khakoo, AY, Patel, S, Wardlow, RD 2nd, Frederick, CA, Hall, G, He, LP, Lederer, WJ (2011) Mesenchymal stem cells stimulate protective genetic reprogramming of injured cardiac ventricular myocytes. Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology 50, 346 – 356. 

Awards and Affiliations

  • National Science Foundation USA-France Postdoctoral Exchange Award, 1977
  • Member, Society for Neuroscience, 1978 – present
  • National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute New Investigator Research Award, 1982 – 1985
  • Member, American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1982 – present
  • National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Research Career Development Award, 1985 – 1990
  • Member, American Heart Association, 1985 – present
  • Member, American Physiological Society, 1990 – present
  • Steering Committee Member, MD/PhD Section, American Association of Medical Colleges, 2006 – 2010
  • Executive Committee, National Association of MD/PhD Programs, 2006 – 2010
  • Member, Howard Hughes Medical Institute 2nd Year Medical Student Fellows Award Review Panel, 2007
  • Member, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Physician Scientist Award Review Panel, 2007
  • Member, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Medical Student Fellows Awards Review Panel, 2007 – 2009
  • Chair, Communications Committee, MD/PhD Section, American Association of Medical Colleges, 2009 – 2012
  • Visiting Distinguished Professor, University of California, Davis, 2011
  • Member, Review Committee for Intramural Stem Cell Research Program, US Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, Maryland, 2011
  • Member, National Council of University Research Administrators, 2014 – present 

Professional Activity

  • Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Food Science, University of California, Davis, California, 1947 – 1978
  • Postdoctoral Fellow (NSF), Department of Biochemistry, University of Nice, France, 1978 – 1979
  • Postdoctoral Fellow (USPHS), Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 1979 – 1980
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 1980 – 1986
  • Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 1986 – 1991
  • Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 1991 – present
  • Director, MD/PhD Program, Office of the Dean, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 1996 – 2012
  • Adjunct Professor, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Rockville, Maryland, 2002 – 2009
  • Executive Director, Office of Research Affairs, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 2014 – present
  • Assistant Dean for Research Affairs, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 2015 – present