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Thomas L. Pallone, MD

Academic Title:

Professor

Primary Appointment:

Medicine

Location:

UMMS, N3W143

Phone (Primary):

410-328-5720

Fax:

410-328-5685

Education and Training

MIT                                                              S.B.          1977          Engineering

Pennsylvania State University                    M.D.          1981          Medicine

Harvard-MIT HST Program                          S.M.          1982          Engineering

 

University of Maryland,  Internal Medicine Residency 1982-85

Stanford University,       Fellowship in Nephrology 1985-88

Biosketch

I  have focused on the physiology of the renal medulla since graduate studies (Medical Engineering Medical Physics program, MIT) to apply engineering principles of heat and mass transfer to countercurrent exchange and microvascular physiology.  After clinical training in Internal Medicine/Nephrology, I returned to the laboratory as a fellow at Stanford to learn experimental methods.  We combined mathematical modeling, micropuncture and microperfusion to delineate transport properties and vasoactivity of vasa recta.  Experimental approaches have been expanded to include fluorescence imaging and electrophysiology, applied to both the smooth muscle (pericytes) and endothelial cells.  The broad goal has been to use experimental measurements to provide inputs to predictive mathematical models and to resolve basic properties of the renal medullary microcirculation.

I established my laboratory at the Pennsylvania State University in Hershey, PA and then joined the faculty in Department of Medicine at the University of Marland in 1995.

Research/Clinical Keywords

kidney, microcirculation, medulla, transport, electrophysiology, ion channels

Highlighted Publications

  1. Zhang Z, Lin H, Cao C, Payne K, Pallone TL. Descending vasa recta endothelial cells and pericytes form mural syncytia. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2014 306(7):F751-63. PubMed PMID:24381184, PMCID:PMC3962606
  2. Zhang Z, Payne K, Cao C, Pallone TL. Mural propagation of descending vasa recta responses to mechanical stimulation. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2013 305(3):F286-94. Epub 2013 May 22. PubMed PMID:23698119, PMCID:PMC3742870
  3. Pallone TL. Complex vascular bundles, thick ascending limbs and aquaporins: wringing out the outer medulla. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2014 306(5):F505-6. PubMed PMID: 24370589 PMCID:PMC3949030
  4. Zhang Z, Payne K, Pallone TL. Syncytial communication in descending vasa recta includes myoendothelial coupling. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 307:F41-52, 2014.  PMID: 24785189  PMCID: PMC4080155
  5. Zhang Z, Payne K, Pallone TL. Descending vasa recta endothelial membrane potential response requires pericyte communication.  PLosO One. 2016. 11(5):e0154948 PMID: 27171211