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Glaser Prize in Imaging

Ed GlaserThe Department has re-established The Glaser Prize in Imaging.

This prize was established to honor Dr. Edmund Glaser when he retired from the Department of Physiology in 1997. Dr. Glaser and his colleague, Dr. Hendrick Van der Loos, made a seminal contribution in the 1960’s by creating the first computer-assisted neuron reconstruction system - Neurolucida. He went on to found a company, MBF Bioscience in Williston, Vermont, to further develop and market software for neuroscience imaging in 1988 with his son Jack Glaser, the current company president.

The prize is awarded for the most visually attractive scientific image submitted by a student working in the current academic year in the laboratory of a faculty member with a primary or secondary appointment in the Department of Physiology. Images may be obtained with any instrument, may be of any cell or tissue type, and may be subjected to any form of post-acquisition modification.

‌Austin Ramsey, a Program in Neuroscience PhD student, is the winner of the 2017 Glaser Prize in Imaging.

His image shows microtubules (pictured to the right) are vital to the infrastructure of neuronal cells. Beyond providing structural support to the cell, they act as rails along which cargo can be transported to the far reaches of the cell periphery.

Additional benefits of microtubule structure is its consistency and size, which is much finer than the diffraction limit of light allows us to resolve, acting as a biological ground truth for microscopy techniques that aim to bend the diffraction limit of light.

Employing these techniques to image individual microtubules enables us to compare and contrast the ability of a technique to accurately capture the structure of a known biological constant. This works well in many preparations, but in dissociated hippocampal neurons (pictured), microtubule organization is highly bundled and complex, making it difficult even for super-resolution microscopy techniques to resolve."

 

Austin Ramsey Glaser Image

Microtubules (pictured) are vital to the infrastructure of neuronal cells. Beyond providing structural support to the cell, they act as rails along which cargo can be transported to the far reaches of the cell periphery. Additional benefits of microtubule structure is its consistency and size, which is much finer than the diffraction limit of light allows us to resolve, acting as a biological ground truth for microscopy techniques that aim to bend the diffraction limit of light. Employing these techniques to image individual microtubules enables us to compare and contrast the ability of a technique to accurately capture the structure of a known biological constant. This works well in many preparations, but in dissociated hippocampal neurons (pictured), microtubule organization is highly bundled and complex, making it difficult even for super-resolution microscopy techniques to resolve."