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Functional Genomics and Molecular Medicine Research Group

The Department of Physiology is responding to the opportunities and challenges of the post-genome sequencing era. We are translating sequence information into an understanding of gene function in health and disease, cracking the code of life. Research programs highlight all areas of the field, including molecular genetics, transgenic and gene knockout technology, physiological genomics, mutagenesis and heterologous expression, analysis of protein-protein interactions, and DNA microarray technology. By combining modern genetic tools with state-of-the-art techniques in physiology, cell biology and neuroscience, our graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and faculty are discovering how genes work in health and fail in disease.  

Faculty & Research Interests

  • Robert Bloch, The structure and function of the membrane systems in muscle, and the effects of muscular dystrophy and other myopathies
  • Thomas Blanpied, Super-resolution microscopy
  • Mordecai Blaustein, Molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling
  • Robert Koos, Molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis
  • W. Jon Lederer, Molecular models of cardiac dysfunction
  • Andrea L. Meredith, Ion Channels
  • Mark Rizzo, Novel optical sensors of activity
  • Alan Shuldiner, Molecular genetics of type 2 (adult) onset diabetes and obesity
  • B. Vogel, Extracellular matrix proteins and cell surface receptors in epithelial morphogenesis and cell architecture, C. Elegans
  • James Wade, Membrane traffic of epithelial transporters and channels
  • Paul Welling, Molecular mechanisms of salt balance and blood pressure control in health and disease
  • Owen Woodward, Disease mutations in gout and kidney disease.